72% of America’s Top Medical Schools Use Racial Politics to Eliminate Applicants

Seventy-two percent of America’s top medical schools use racial politics to weed out applicants, according to a review conducted by medical advocacy group Do No Harm.

According to the review, 72 percent of the nation’s top 50 schools and 80 percent of the top ten ask “probing questions to elicit responses from the applicant about his or her views on diversity, equity, and inclusion topics.”

The Duke University School of Medicine — ranked number six in the country — boasts that it has been “nationally recognized for its commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion.” In an essay prompt for applicants to the school, admissions asks:

Potential sources of health inequities include race, gender, education, income, disability, geographic location, and sexual orientation. Moments to Movement (M2M) is Duke’s collective stand against systemic racism and injustice. The name signifies going beyond passive moments of reflection and becoming more active as we build to make lasting change for our patients, their loved ones and each other. Describe your understanding of race and its relationship to inequities in health and health care. [Emphasis added].

The number 14-ranked school — the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine — prompts applicants to answer the following:

We are interested in combating all forms of systemic barriers, and would like to hear your thoughts on opposing specifically: systemic racism, anti-LGBTQ+ discrimination, and misogyny. How will you contribute?

In addition, the number 43-ranked medical school in the country at the University of Minnesota asks applicants whether they have “personally experienced or acted with implicit or explicit bias,” and then goes on to prompt a response to the following:

Our country is reckoning with its history, racism, racial injustice, and especially anti-black racism. Please share your reflections on, experiences with, and greatest lessons learned about systemic racism.

As Breitbart News previously reported, the Association of American Medical Colleges released new standards for teaching medicine that require students to achieve “competencies” in “white privilege,” “anti-colonialism,” and “race as a social construct,” among other race-essentialist ideas.

“Since the founding of the United States, there have been systemic health and health care inequities grounded in racism, sexism, homophobia, classism, and other forms of discrimination that still permeate our current health system,” the “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Competencies Across the Learning Continuum,” which the AAMC released in July month, states.

The AAMC has some control over medical school accreditation and also administers the MCAT — the medical school admissions exam.

“Many questions cross a clear line from asking applicants to describe their background and life experiences to demanding their explicit support and enthusiasm for a worldview and agenda that is fundamentally political in nature,” the Do No Harm review concluded. “These demands for endorsement of specific political ideas in order to be considered for admission may constitute, or be close to constituting, compelled speech.”

“Top medical schools have woven their commitment to woke politics into their application process, asking future doctors to prove their commitment to divisive ideologies or risk being rejected from medical school,” it said.

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